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Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
Mon Apr 11, 2011, 05:17 PM (This post was last modified: Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:18 PM by lightning64.)
Post: #1
Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
Im always interested in making my PC more personal by buying them piece by piece, rather than buying laptops(Everything's fixed) or Computer presets made by shops(Maybe they're ripping you out already~)

Now i seek help and tips from you guys the ways of building a bit more personal computer...

Thoughts in my head

-Do casings have something of importance other than being pretty?
-Sound cards seem default...
-What is the purpose of a processor itself... and its differences from each other...
-When looking at numbers(1gb of video card, 4GB of ram) are they the ones REALLY counting...?
-There are other slots in the motherboard that isnt been using... what are those components missing....?
-Ermmm... monitors....
-Bigger numbers? 500 watts... or 1k watts of voltage... why am i picking?

Im really basic into these so my apologies.... >___<

.... And no i cant afford Macs anyway

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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 06:34 PM
Post: #2
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
http://www.corsair.com/
http://www.antec.com/Believe_it/
Yes, casings provide a house for all your components, and as such, you must purchase one that can hold it all.
There are actually different sound cards, you just have to look in the right places. Like nVidia: http://www.nvidia.com/object/apu.html
A processor... Takes input data and turns it into something useful.
I'm a bit unsure about this myself, but i assume that the bugger the memory, the more processing power it has.
What slots?
Monitors... Depends on what you plan ongoing with the computer. A monitor with a higher resolution can make everything look really pretty, but you will need a powerful computer to do all that.
Power really depends on the processing power of your computer. If it is a high-end gaming rig with 64 GB of RAM, tri-core processor, water-cooled etc. , it's gonna eat through the volts like... Can anyone provide a suitable simile? Right. Therefore, you're going to want to give your CPU sufficient power.

Not all the information here is accurate, and should be taken with a pinch of salt. Such computers are often cheap(er) than buying a ready-made Alienware or such, and most gamers do this, as such computers run much better. You want parts? Links are above.

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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 07:07 PM
Post: #3
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
(Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:17 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -Do casings have something of importance other than being pretty?

Casings should allow ample airflow to keep the components inside cool. Do consult reviews on the Internet to ensure that the case you intend to purchase has ample mounting points for additional casing fans if you do need to install more.

(Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:17 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -Sound cards seem default...

Standard built-in sound cards on the motherboard should provide you satisfactory performance for the casual user. A dedicated sound card might be more suitable for those who require more strict audio tolerances, such as sound engineers or implementation of more complex audio technologies.

(Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:17 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -What is the purpose of a processor itself... and its differences from each other...

The processor is basically the brain of the computer. Traditionally, the faster the processor, the faster it can process data. However, as we reach the limit of Moore's law, we start to see processor companies take on heavier workloads by splitting it across multiple processor cores. Most new computers come with at least two cores, with more mainstream computers adopting 4 cores.

Differences usually include small little details, such as the amount of cache a processor has, its speed and just how far you can overclock it. The choice of processor depends on what you plan to use your computer for.

(Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:17 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -When looking at numbers(1gb of video card, 4GB of ram) are they the ones REALLY counting...?

In terms of numbers, things like RAM and hard disk storage are important. However, if you want the best performance, then looking at the nitty gritty details outweigh the sheer size quoted by manufacturers. For example, a 500GB hard disk isn't just a 500GB hard disk. It could be a 5400RPM or 7200RPM hard drive, RPM being the rotational speeds of a hard drive. The faster the rotation, the faster a hard drive can access data.

Memory modules, too, have different speeds. As a rule of thumb, the faster, the better; but your motherboard should support the speed of memory you plan to install. They should be installed in pairs (or, in some cases, triples). Your choice of platform will depend on the choice of hardware.

For video cards, the larger the memory buffer, the better it will be able to handle higher resolutions, especially in gaming.

(Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:17 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -There are other slots in the motherboard that isnt been using... what are those components missing....?

You might find 2 main types of slots you'll find; PCI and PCIe.

PCI Express (PCIe) comes in two forms; PCIe x1 and PCIe x8/x16. The smallest one, usually the size of your fingernail, is PCIe x1. Most modern sound cards will plug into PCIe x1. The longer ones, usually coloured by motherboard manufacturers and coming in pairs (or triples, even quadruples), are for add-ons, like graphic cards and RAID expansion cards.

PCI slots are few and far between, usually being only the only unique slot on modern motherboards (or none, in some cases). This slot is usually for add-on cards that require less bandwidth, such as wireless Wi-Fi cards for desktops.

(Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:17 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -Ermmm... monitors....

Most monitors are now wide-screen, but there are a few things to look out for.

In terms of resolution, there are two types of aspect ratios you will find; 16:9 or 16:10. You can note the differences on the shelf as the advertised monitor size will give you an indication of what aspect ratio you will find. 24 and 30 inch monitors have 16:10 resolutions, while 21.5, 23 and 27 inch monitors have 16:9 resolutions. The differences are slight (1920 x 1080 vs 1920 x 1200 for a 16:9 and 16:10 aspect ratio respectively), but most 16:9 monitors max out at HD resolution (1920 x 1080), with some 27 inch displays topping out at 2560 x 1440. 16:10 monitors go up to 2560 x 1600, but those are quite pricey and require graphic cards with enough horsepower.

Take note of the different panel technologies as well. Most panels use something called TN (Twisted Nematic), which can be found in almost every other LCD panel. While they generally provide good image quality, issues such as colour reproduction may not be as accurate as the other type of technology, relegating TN panels to consumer-grade status. IPS (In-Plane Switching) panels offer better colour reproduction and superior viewing angles as compared to TN panels, but can cost quite a bit more. IPS panels are also harder to find, mainly found in Apple Cinema Displays and Dell UltraSharp panels. Unless a panel explicitly states that it is an IPS panel, it is usually a TN panel.

(Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:17 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -Bigger numbers? 500 watts... or 1k watts of voltage... why am i picking?

Choosing a power supply depends on what sort of components you're going to be putting into your computer. However, the one component that might well decide how powerful your power supply will be is your graphics card. The more powerful a graphics card, the more power it will consume. You might see that some graphics card manufacturers recommend a specifically rated PSU (Power Supply Unit) in order to keep your computer running smoothly. Choosing an underpowered PSU might lead to your computer crashing as the PSU struggles to keep a steady flow of power to your graphics card.

Also, with the whole green movement, some PSUs come with an 80 Plus rating. 80 Plus is an indication of its power efficiency. The better the 80 Plus rating (Bronze, Silver or Gold), the less energy is wasted in the form of exhaust heat.



The Horse hope this helps.

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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 07:35 PM (This post was last modified: Mon Apr 11, 2011 07:38 PM by cartoonwolf.)
Post: #4
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
(Mon Apr 11, 2011 07:07 PM)Hollud Wrote:  The Horse hope this helps.
Here's the silly wolf's more beginner-friendly attempt to answer said questions Smile

I think the first question you should ask is, what is the computer going to be used for? Office work, internet, gaming, digital art, video editing, or simply to experience building a PC?

That being said, there are some good guides for building a PC floating around... here's one:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/buil...,2601.html

On to the answers...

The case serves a skeleton or foundation that hold everything together. Also, its size determines whether you have enough room inside to add more stuff later. It also (usually) keeps stuff like dust, cat hair, and small insects/animals out of the PC's components.

Sound cards are usually built into the motherboard these days, and they're generally good enough for everyday use, so you won't need to buy a separate one.

The processor is like the 'brain' of the PC. It's where all the 'thinking' happens. A faster processor thinks faster Smile (i.e., it takes less time to do things)

As for memory (RAM) numbers, bigger is better. The most important one is system RAM, usually 4 GB these days -- more RAM means your PC won't slow down (due to swapping) when you run many programs all at once. The graphics card RAM is important if you're a gamer -- bigger numbers usually mean you can load higher quality textures and the game will look better.

The 'other slots' you see nowadays are usually the PCI-express x1 slot (seldom used), a PCI-express x8 slot (for an extra graphics card), and PCI slot (for LAN cards, wifi cards, sound cards).

Monitors... the most important consideration is size, and that would depend on what you want to use it for, on the size of your desk, and how far away you're sitting from it.

The wattage indicates the power supply's (PSU) capability. Once you have all your parts picked out, you can calculate how much power it'll need and then buy a PSU with the appropriate wattage (i.e., with some headroom). Bigger isn't always better, because if you have a relatively low-powered system, a high-wattage PSU won't be as efficient producing power in that range.
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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 07:47 PM
Post: #5
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
What hollud said. but shorter
He's a stud. he makes everything....bigger
(Mon Apr 11, 2011 05:17 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -Do casings have something of importance other than being pretty?
-Sound cards seem default...
-What is the purpose of a processor itself... and its differences from each other...
-When looking at numbers(1gb of video card, 4GB of ram) are they the ones REALLY counting...?
-There are other slots in the motherboard that isnt been using... what are those components missing....?
-Ermmm... monitors....
-Bigger numbers? 500 watts... or 1k watts of voltage... why am i picking?

Casing Provides Ventilation. You either get one or cover it with liquid nitrogen [if you're into overpowering your computer].

Sound cards. Defaults uses only 2 speakers. there are good soundcards that supplies up to 10 speakers for surround.

Processor. Speed. Basically it's a brain. how many things could be done at one time refers to this little guy.

Video Cards are usually for games. or really high 3D graphics design programs. RAM are.... the brain's hands. they grab stuff from places. :x

Slots are for other stuffs that aren't included on the motherboard. Sound, Graphics, network. those kind of stuff.

Monitors. Depends on what resolution you want. bigger = better....usually.

Power supply. the more you get, the more accessories you can power up. Graphic cards, Hard disc. those kind of stuff are considered accessories.
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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 08:24 PM
Post: #6
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
I guess ill just put a bit more thoughts~

-What is Overclocking?

-In Holluds example of the RPM speed, does the higher RPM give more risks due to its speed than the lower tier ones?

-Is speed(memory) affected by what is left of the space available on the HDD, Not just programs running in the BG?

@Cartoonwolf

Good all around computer with a bit more edge to gaming(And 3d/video work Tongue)

--
Also thank you every one for the answers, really really helpful Smile

As for my next plans

What are the components needed for a computer(What is needed and what is optional(No need for the basics, wanting to go a bit in-depth o: ))

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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 08:57 PM (This post was last modified: Mon Apr 11, 2011 09:05 PM by Canis Enigmas.)
Post: #7
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
I think the 2 best advice that can be given for such circumstances is this :

1. Have a backup system ready
Because, like the opposite OEM systems and Macs, self assembled PCs are part science and part voodoo. There is no easy, no problems, keep your hair intact, path to a self assembled PC system. Odds are you will have one of those "gremlins" popping out of nowhere. Like, for instance, a specific graphics card can't work with this other network card or this processor model and this RAM brand has a small glitch and to fix it, they must be arranged in a certain pattern while the blood of a pure virgin is dripped over the corner of the heatsink at a certain angle on the 3rd day and 4th hour of the full moon ... yeah ... something like that. You'll need that additional system to get in contact with online forums or call on for Satan to help if you do hit these problems Tongue

2. Have a friend who is knowledgeable of this stuff on your speed dial
Let's be honest, those of us who are experienced at assembling computers didn't earn our badges for nothing. PCs are well known to cause premature baldness in many users as well as created endless new job opportunities in call centers in India. So ensure you have a good friend, who has earned his badge through the years of PC frustration, ready to help you. Cause this is the best way to ensure to plan for the unexpected ... and to save your bacon when the unexpected happens in the end Winking
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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 09:35 PM
Post: #8
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
Overclocking = Driving your Processor beyond it's recommended level. Every Processor is limited about 70% of it's maximum capability. Overclocking is driving it over the 70% in exchange for more heat and more energy used. [Sorta like how you rev up your engine to go 200MPH]

The only risk of getting a higher RPM Hard disk is to your wallet. and probably the energy used to power up the hard disk. nothing else as far as we're concerned.

RAM Speed is affected by how many programs running in the background. Hard disk space affects how many program goes into the hard disk. They're totally separate. The more program you have running = The more slower everything goes.

Depending on your budget, you could get something like a Core i5. Or a core 2 Quad for a whole mix and match on the accessories such as sounds/Video.
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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 10:00 PM (This post was last modified: Mon Apr 11, 2011 10:01 PM by Hollud.)
Post: #9
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
(Mon Apr 11, 2011 08:24 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -What is Overclocking?

Something I wouldn't recommend doing unless you know what you're doing.

Overclocking is basically increasing the speed of key components (namely the CPU and RAM) to gain faster performance. However, in doing so, you generate quite a bit of heat. You need to have the right equipment to keep your stuff cool, or you'll burn it out faster than a traditional incandescent lightbulb.

Both Intel and AMD have dabbled in safe overclocking. Intel CPUs have a feature called "Turbo Boost", which temporarily increases the speed based on what workload is being tasked with the processor. This is built-in and is part of the processor's way of handling whatever you throw at it. AMD has a complete system overclocking utility called "Overdrive" that you can install. This gives you finer control on what aspects to overclock, or just use the recommended system defaults to overclock automatically.

Either way, I would not recommend overclocking when building your first computer. As our resident Anubis has pointed out, experiment only with a secondary (or third-in-line) custom rig since one wrong overclock could spell the end of your precious computer.



(Mon Apr 11, 2011 08:24 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -In Holluds example of the RPM speed, does the higher RPM give more risks due to its speed than the lower tier ones?

No. 5400 RPM and 7200 RPM disk drives have been in the market for quite some time now, and both spin at stable speeds. The difference is that the faster spinning disk might consume a little bit more power and produce a little bit more heat. That's why some manufacturers brand their 5400 RPM drives as "eco" drives and their 7200 RPM models as "performance" drives.



(Mon Apr 11, 2011 08:24 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  -Is speed(memory) affected by what is left of the space available on the HDD, Not just programs running in the BG?

Operating systems maintain a virtual allocation of memory on your hard disk. This is known as a pagefile. Simply put, stuff that cannot fit into the RAM is stored in the pagefile. If you have a modern operating system and at least 2GB of memory, you should not have any problem. The more RAM you have, the more the workload your computer should be able to handle

That said, you still have to get a fast hard drive to keep up with what you are doing. Running multiple applications at once means the hard disk still has to access various bits of data for various applications. Maintaining a lean set of applications is one of the ways to ensure good performance; keep only applications you need open and don't run the ones that you don't.

The hard disk bottleneck is one of the reasons why SSDs are popular in performance computers. With no moving parts, accessing data on SSDs can result in significant performance improvements. However, SSDs are rather costly and require a significant investment. Furthermore, for their price, the capacities offered that one can afford is pathetically small. When the price of SSDs have reached more consumer-friendly prices, only then should you consider installing one in your future computer.



(Mon Apr 11, 2011 08:24 PM)lightning64 Wrote:  What are the components needed for a computer(What is needed and what is optional(No need for the basics, wanting to go a bit in-depth o: ))

You can take a look at the special Buyers Guides on Tom's Hardware to get a glimpse of just what is needed to build a computer from scratch. Furthermore, the guides are broken down into distinct price categories, making it easier to distinguish just sort of components goes into each category. Do bear in mind that being a U.S. site, the prices are in USD.

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Mon Apr 11, 2011, 10:41 PM
Post: #10
RE: Custom building your own PC's for beginners? c:
Speaking of Overclocking.

What you need for extreme overclocking. LOTS AND LOTS OF LIQUID NITROGEN!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfpNFfLX9Ng

Otherwise. Something like this will happend. WITH OR WITHOUT THE HEATSINK [AKA The fan or the metal thingy on your Processor]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06MYYB9bl70
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